The Real Liddy James - Anne-Marie Casey

An exuberant new novel about a modern-day superwoman who leans in so far she falls over.

Liddy James is forty-four, fit, and fabulous. One of New York's top divorce attorneys, a bestselling author, and a mother of two, she glides through the courtrooms and salons of the Manhattan elite with ease. Despite a devastating divorce from her first love, literature professor Peter James, Liddy, Peter, and Peter's sympathetic new partner, Rose, have formed a modern family to raise Liddy and Peter's truculent teen and Liddy's adorable, if fatherless, six-year-old. With her lonely and impoverished childhood far behind her, to the outside world Liddy's life is perfect.

Until it isn't.

When Rose announces an unexpected pregnancy, Liddy's beloved nanny takes flight, a high-profile divorce case becomes too personal, and the bill for a roof repair looms, Liddy realizes she may have finally bitten off more than she can chew. Long overdue for time off, she takes her sons and heads to Ireland to retrace her family's history. But marooned in the Celtic countryside, things are still far from simple, and Liddy takes on a stormy neighbor, an unorthodox wedding, and a surprise guest before she's willing to admit that even she might have forgotten just how to be the real Liddy James.

 

This book was a solid read about another overloaded woman finding balance.

 

I related quite a bit to Liddy in that I also often put too much on my plate, and I took some pleasure in seeing how she dealt with everything as it came, but I didn't enjoy seeing it all fall apart as it inevitably would. And while in most chick flick books this would be funny--cringeworthy, but funny--I found myself just cringing.

 

I didn't really like Liddy. I wanted to and I could see the aspects where I was supposed to sympathise with her. However, I found myself not really caring, and thus when she decided to chase her family history I found myself flipping pages just to get to the end.

 

Sebastian ended up being my favourite character--a competing divorce lawyer, he provides some comic relief and kept me on my toes. I generally don't like to adore the male figure, but he was fantastic and elicited a lot of angry emotions from me.

 

On the other hand, I found myself getting really annoyed with the way the kids in the book were treated--I felt like they deserved more than they received, especially Cal, the younger one.

 

I probably won't ever reread this one, but it nonetheless kept me occupied.

 

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.